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Posts from the ‘From the Colloquium’ Category

From the Colloquium

In the first half of the spring 2019 semester, the Lilly Postdoctoral Fellows at Valparaiso University focused primarily on questions around the meaning of education: what does it mean to teach and learn, and how does the Christian tradition help us consider the purposes of education within the context of a whole human life?

In the second half of the semester, the Postdoctoral Fellows have turned to the question of vocation. They read John Williams’ novel Stoner, which tells the story of William Stoner, a young man born on a farm who is sent to the University of Missouri to study agriculture. At the University of Missouri, Stoner is taken with the study of literature, ultimately pursues a PhD, and becomes a professor of English there. The novel follows Stoner throughout his career at University of Missouri.

Stoner, as well as the Lilly Fellows’ own reflective essays, inspired thoughtful consideration of the question of vocation. Particularly in light of the shrinking availability of tenure-track opportunities in the humanities, and more generally the difficulties that colleges and universities are facing at this time, we asked what it means to have a vocation in the humanities. Could a vocation be something broader than a particular job? Instead of a vocation as “a college teacher of English,” maybe someone like Stoner’s vocation was “an interpreter of literature,” and perhaps college teaching was one avenue to pursue that vocation, but there are other avenues that fulfill that vocation as well.

We concluded the spring 2019 semester by discussing the thought-provoking poem, “I Don’t Want to Be a Spice Store,” by Christian Wiman, which explores the idea of usefulness.

From the Colloquium

During the spring 2019, the Lilly Postdoctoral Fellows at Valparaiso University have thoughtfully considered the meaning of education, and what constitutes teaching and learning. Mark Schwehn and Dorothy Bass are guiding the discussion around the question: How does the Christian tradition help us to consider the purposes of education and the vocation of an educator within the larger context of a whole human life?

The discussion began with a film: The Wild Child by Francois Truffaut, which considers the story of a feral child in the late 18th century in the south of France. Later named Victor, the feral child is found by hunters and captured. Dr. Jean Marc Gaspard Itard, a young physician, takes custody of him and tries to teach and socialize him, with the help of a nurse. Throughout the semester, we have considered, to what extent is our teaching similar to and different from Itard’s education of Victor. How are our views on education different from and similar to those of Itard and his nurse?

We then move to two selections from Everyone a Teacher, edited by Mark Schwehn, Eva Brann’s “Depth and Desire” and Philip W. Jackson’s “Real Teaching.” Brann explores the questions around how to awaken desire within students. Where should a teacher or curriculum begin? Do students bring a certain amount of “freshness” with them when they begin?

Jackson considers what constitutes teaching. He considers whether a salesperson could have a good day without anyone buying anything, and likewise whether a teacher can be a good teacher without students learning anything. In the current landscape of both K-12 and increasingly postsecondary education, student learning outcomes are increasingly being used not only to guide instruction, but also to measure teacher quality. This is a trend that can be both helpful and problematic; however, we went on to consider, what kinds of student learning are most important, and how do we know whether students have attained them? We also asked what it means to have “had a good class” on a particular day, and how our interpretation of our teaching changes over time.

We then went on to read excerpts from Linda Zagzebski’s Exemplarist Moral Theory, which suggests that people admire moral excellence and that the emotion of admiration awakens a desire to emulate that moral excellence. Not all exemplars have all virtues, but a particular exemplar, for example one who demonstrates great courage, would move us to be more courageous. An exemplar who demonstrates great compassion would move us to be more compassionate, even if that exemplar did not also demonstrate courage. We discussed the role of exemplary figures, both historical and fictional, in teaching, and whether a complicated figure can also be exemplary.

Additionally this semester, the postdoctoral fellows will have the opportunity to attend the Bach Institute’s performance of Johann Sebastian Bach’s “St. Matthew Passion,” performed by the Valparaiso University Chorale and Bach Choir, with the Ft. Wayne Children’s Choir. Christopher Cock, who holds the Duesenberg Chair in Lutheran Music and is the director of the Bach institute, came to lead a discussion preceding the performance. The discussion was most enlightening, and gave the Lilly Fellows a number of contexts—musical, historical, and liturgical—for better understanding the performance of the “St. Matthew Passion.”

They will conclude the semester with readings from Leading Lives that Matter on the topic of whether it is possible to lead a balanced life, and whether a balanced life is preferable to a life that focuses on work, and with John Williams’ novel Stoner. Stoner tells the story of William Stoner, a young man who grows up on a farm in rural Missouri. Stoner is sent to the University of Missouri to study agriculture to help his family, but there he is taken with the study of literature, and eventually pursues a PhD and becomes a professor of English at the University of Missouri. The novel follows Stoner throughout his life and explores, among other things, the role that Stoner’s work as a college teacher plays in his life.

Posted by Jenna Van Sickle

From the Colloquium, Graduate Fellows Edition

Since 2006, the Lilly Fellows Program  has published a “From the Colloquium” column about four times per year. The idea behind this column is to share some of the common readings from the colloquia of the Lilly Postdoctoral Fellows Program and the Lilly Graduate Fellows Program. These works can be of great value for mentoring programs or faculty development projects at different campuses (or to add to your own reading lists).

Common readings and group discussion have been central to the Lilly Fellows Program’s (LFP) fellowship programs from their start twenty-nine years ago. First with the Lilly Postdoctoral Teaching Fellowship program at Valparaiso University starting in 1992 and then with the Lilly Graduate Fellows Program in 2008, Fellows have encountered readings intended to engage Christian thought and practice as they intersect the tasks of teaching and scholarship that make up the work we do in the academy. The readings address these issues on both the personal and institutional level, examining our individual practices as scholars as well as those of our academic institutions (with, of course, a special emphasis on those institutions of higher learning that connect to a church-related mission).

Once a year, we focus on the readings that the three active cohorts of Lilly Graduate Fellows discuss. These Fellows are in their first three years of Graduate school. Each semester, the Lilly Graduate Fellow cohorts select readings that cluster around a particular theme. Here are some of those readings.

Members of the Eighth Cohort of Lilly Graduate Fellows, who began graduate work in fall, 2015, addressed the topic, “Scholarship as a Christian Vocation” in fall, 2017, and the topic, “Scholarship, Secularization, and vocation as a Calling,” in spring, 2018. The Mentors for the Eighth Cohort are Patrick Byrne of Boston College and Susan VanZanten of Valparaiso University. To grapple with the fall topic, the cohort read: Paul Griffiths’ commentary on The Song of Songs, selections from The Secularization of the Academy edited by George Marsden and Bradley Longfield, Marsden’s The Outrageous Idea of Christian Scholarship, Bernard Lonergan, “Sacralization and Secularization,” Michael Hamilton, “The Elusive Idea of Christian Scholarship, Charles Taylor’s essay “A Catholic Modernity” and Rosemary Luling Haughton’s “Transcendence and the Bewilderment of Being Moder,” both in James Heft, ed. A Catholic Modernity?: Charles Taylor’s Marianist Award Lecture, Flannery O’Connor’s “Everything that Rises Must Converge,” James V. Schal’s “What is a Lecture?” and short selection from his On the Unseriousness of Human Affairs, G.K. Chesterton’s “Introductioon to the Book of Job,” and musical selections:  Gabriel Fauré, Requiem, VI: “Libera me, Domine”; Johannes Brahms, Ein Deutsches Requiem, VI: “Denn wir haben hie keine bleibende Statt”; and Gustav Mahler, Symphony No. 2, “Resurrection”, V: Finale, “Aufersteh’n.”  In the spring, the cohort read selections from William Placher’s Callings—a work often used by the Fellows—Walter Miller’s A Canticle for Liebowitz, Patrick J. DeNeen’s “Against Great Books,” selections from Dorothy Day’s The Long Loneliness, Selections from Emmanuel Falque’ “The Metamorphosis of Finitude,” Peter Coviello and Jared Hickman, “Introduction: After the Postsecular,” Khaled Furani, “Is There a Postsecular,” and Douglas Koskela’s Calling and Clarity. At their final conference, they discussed Marilynne Robinson’s Gilead.

The members of the Ninth Cohort of Lilly Graduate Fellows, who completed the second year of their fellowship and who began their graduate studies in the fall of 2016, have been mentored by Douglas Henry of Baylor University and Gretchen J. Van Duke of The University of Scranton. The themes for the year was “Strangers and Sojourners: Learning, Telling, Teaching, and Reaching for Truth.” Rather than a single “spine text” and accompanying articles, the cohort focused on three works: Dorothy Day’s The Long Loneliness, Paul J. Griffiths’ Intellectual Appetite, and Thomas Merton’s The Seven Story. Griffith’s work in Intellectual Appetite—essentially an interrogation of intellectual pursuit from a Christian theological lens—has long stimulated intense debate among graduate fellows. Though many disagree with his arguments, they nevertheless offer, to many of us, an important opportunity to examine some of the most central claims about the “creation of knowledge”—an ideal at the heart of the academic enterprise. At their summer conference, the Cohort examined the theme, “Marked By the Sign of the Cross: Living Blessed Lives in the Midst of Faith and Doubt” by reading biblical texts on the story of Abraham and Sarah and the complex person of Peter, along with some Psalms illustrating the wide range of biblical accounts of hardship and uncertainty. They also discussed C. S. Lewis’s A Grief Observed, Immaculée Ilibagiza’s Left to Tell, and they screened the film Of Gods and Men. They also discussed Ron Hansen’s Exiles, Flannery O’Connor’s prayer journal, and the poetry of Denise Levertov.

The members of the Tenth Cohort of Lilly Graduate Fellows, who began graduate school and the program in fall 2017, read and discussed materials focused, in the fall, on the theme “Hospitality” and in the spring on the theme, “Intellection and Affection OR Keeping the Body and Soul Together in Graduate School.”  The Tenth Cohort’s mentors are Lisa DeBoer of Westmont College and John Ware of Xavier University of Louisiana. For the theme of “Hospitality,” the Tenth Cohort read Kathleen Norris’ Acedia and Me, Amy Oden’s And You Welcomed Me, Christine Pohl’s Making Room, John Witvliet and Martin Tel, Eds., Psalms for All Seasons, The Rule of Benedict, Augustine’s Confessions, Sayings of the Desert Fathers (trans. Benedicta Ward), and they viewed the film, Of Gods and Men. To address the spring’s theme, they read James Elkin’s Pictures and Tears, which examines the role of emotion in scholarship, Tom Stoppard’s play, Arcadia, Simone Weil’s Waiting for God, and TaNehisi Coats’ Between the World and Me. For their annual summer conference, cohort members read and discussed George Eliot’s Middlemarch.

Posted by Joe Creech

 

 

 

 

From the Colloquium, Graduate Fellows Edition

Since 2006, the Lilly Fellows Program  has published a “From the Colloquium” column about four times per year. The idea behind this column is to share some of the common readings from the colloquia of the Lilly Postdoctoral Fellows Program and the Lilly Graduate Fellows Program. These works can be of great value for mentoring programs or faculty development projects at different campuses (or to add to your own reading lists).

Common readings and group discussion have been central to the Lilly Fellows Program’s (LFP) fellowship programs from their start twenty-seven years ago. First with the Lilly Postdoctoral Teaching Fellowship program at Valparaiso University starting in 1992 and then with the Lilly Graduate Fellows Program in 2008, Fellows have encountered readings intended to engage Christian thought and practice as they intersect the tasks of teaching and scholarship that make up the work we do in the academy. The readings address these issues on both the personal and institutional level, examining our individual practices as scholars as well as those of our academic institutions (with, of course, a special emphasis on those institutions of higher learning that connect to a church-related mission).

Once a year, we focus on the readings that the three active cohorts of Lilly Graduate Fellows discuss. These Fellows are in their first three years of Graduate school. Each semester, the Lilly Graduate Fellow cohorts select readings that cluster around a particular theme. Here are some of those readings.

The members of the Seventh Cohort of Lilly Graduate Fellows, who began graduate school and the program in fall 2014 and who just completed their three year program, read and discussed materials focused, in the fall, on the theme “God’s Gift and Our Response” and in the spring on the theme, “Fulfilling our Vocations in God’s World.” The Seventh Cohort’s mentors are Paul Contino of Pepperdine University and Susan Felch of Calvin College. To explore these topics, the Seventh Cohort selected Dostoevsky’s Brothers Karamazov as a spine text for both semesters.  In both the fall and spring they supplemented Dostoevsky’s text with Fritz Eichenberg’s, Lithographs for The Brothers Karamazov and Rowan Williams’, Dostoevsky: Language, Faith, and Fiction. In addition, the fall the cohort read: Margaret Kenna, “Icons in Theory and Practice” (History of Religions, Vol. 24, No. 4 [May, 1985]: 345-368); Oleg Komkov, “The Vertical Form”; articles by Leonid Ouspensky and Vladimir Lossky in The Meaning of Icons; Marilynne Robinson’s, “Facing Reality” from The Death of Adam, Eleonore Stump’s, “Second-Person Accounts and the Problem of Evil” (Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia [Oct. – Dec., 2001]: 745-771); Charles Taylor’s, “God Loveth Adverbs” from Sources of the Self, Simone Weil’s, “The Love of our Neighbor” from Waiting for God, and essays by Paul J. Contino on Zosima (“Zosima, Mikhail, and Prosaic Confessional Dialogue in Dostoevsky’s Brothers Karamazov,” Studies in the Novel, Vol 27, No. 1 [spring 1995]: 63-86), Alyosha (“The Prudential Alyosha Karamazov: The Russian Realist from a Catholic Perspective,” in Dostoevsky and Christianity: Art, Faith, and Dialogue in a special volume of Dostoevsky Monographs, Volume VI. Ed. Jordi Morillas [St. Petersburg, Russia: Dmitry Bulanin]. 2015), Ivan (“’Descend That You May Ascend’: Augustine, Dostoevsky, and the Confessions of Ivan Karamazov,” in Augustine and Literature, ed. Robert P. Kennedy, Kim Paffenroth, and John Doody, Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield), and Mitya (“Incarnational Realism and the Case of Casuistry: Dmitry Karamazov’s Escape” in Dostoevsky’s Brothers Karamazov: Art, Creativity, and Spirituality, ed. Predrag Cicovacki and Maria Granik, Heidelberg, 2010).  They also listened to Sacred Treasures: Choral Masterworks from Russia. In the spring, and in preparation for a final conference in Krakow, Poland, the cohort viewed the film, Ida, and read Bruce Berglund’s, “Drafting a historical Geography of East European Christianity” in Christianity and Modernity in Eastern Europe, ed. Bruce R. Berglund and Brian A. Porter; Don DeGraaf’s, There and Back: Living and Learning Abroad, Mary Douglas, Á Feeling for Hierarchy”; C. S. Lewis’s, “Meditation in a Toolshed”; Czeslaw Milosz’s, To Begin Where I Am and poems; selections from Parker Palmer’s, The Courage to Teach; selections from David Smith and Susan Felch’s, Teaching and Christian Imagination; Timothy Steele’s, “An Ordinary Life in Academe”; selections from Hans Urs von Balthasar, Love Alone is Credible, Susan VanZanten’s, Joining the Mission; George Wiegel’s, City of Saints, Elie Wiesel’s, Night, and Adam Zagajewski, A Defense of Ardor and poems.

Members of the Eighth Cohort of Lilly Graduate Fellows, who began graduate work in fall, 2015, addressed the topic, “Teaching as a Christian Vocation” in fall, 2016, and the topic, “Protestants and Catholics in Conversation,” in spring, 2017. The Mentors for the Eighth Cohort are Patrick Byrne of Boston College and Susan VanZanten of Seattle Pacific University. To grapple with the fall topic, the cohort read: Augustine’s, The First Catechetical Instruction; Ken Bain, What the Best College Teachers Do (which many cohorts have used); St. Basil, “Address to Young Men on the Right Use of Greek Literature”; Patrick Byrne, “Paradigms of Justice and Love” in Conversations on Jesuit Higher Education (Spring, 1995); selections from John Calvin’s Institutes; Karen Eifler and Thomas M. Landy, Becoming Beholders (winner of the 2015 LFP Book Award); various readings by Stanley Fish on the role of moral formation (or lack thereof) in higher education; Ron Kirkemo, “At the Lectern Between Jerusalem and Sarajevo” in Teaching as an Act of Faith, ed. Arlin Migliazzo; selections from Parker Palmer’s, The Courage to Teach; Mark Roche, “Should Faculty Members Teach Virtues and Values?” (another piece often read by the Graduate Fellows); Susan VanZanten, Joining the Mission: A Guide for (Mostly) New Faculty, and selections from Mark R. Schwehn, ed,.  Everyone a Teacher, and Nicholas Wolterstorff, Educating for Shalom: Essays on Christian Higher Education. To explore the way different groups of Protestants and Catholics have approached issues of faith and reason, the cohort read: Justo L. González’s, The Story of Christianity: The Reformation to the Present Day (vol. 2); selections from Denis R. Janz, A Reformation Reader; St. Paul’s Letter to the Romans; N.T. Wright, “Romans and the Theology of Paul” in Pauline Theology, Vol. III, ed. David M. Hay & E. Elizabeth Johnson, 1995; numerous literary, theological, and artistic primary sources from the Reformation era; Fleming, “How Ignatian Spirituality Gives Us a Way to Discern God’s Will”; selected poems by Julia Kasdorf; Brad S. Gregory, “Why the Reformation Still Matters (Whether We Want It To or Not)” (presented at the 2016 LFP Annual National Conference); and Dale Van Kley, “Where the Rot Started?” Review of Brad S. Gregory’s The Unintended Reformation: How a Religious Revolution Secularized Society.

The members of the Ninth Cohort of Lilly Graduate Fellows, who completed the first year of their fellowship and who began their graduate studies in the fall of 2016, have been mentored by Douglas Henry of Baylor University and Gretchen J. Van Dyke of The University of Scranton. The themes for the fall and spring were “In Search of the Way: Ordering our Lives and Loves” and “Taking the Upward Way: True Love, Liberty, and Saintliness,” respectively.  The “spine” text for the fall was Dante’s Inferno, and the group supplemented this text with selections from Jones, L. Gregory and Stephanie Paulsell’s The Scope of Our Art: The Vocation of the Theological Teacher, which has been a standard text for most of the Graduate Fellows, and they also engaged the poetry of Gerard Manley Hopkins and Mary Oliver. The “spine” text for the spring was Dante’s Purgatorio, which almost all the cohorts of Lilly Graduate Fellows have engaged as a text that works trough the aims and activities of teaching, moral formation, and the particular vices associated with intellectual work.  The cohort members supplemented this text with Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung’s Glittering Vices: A New Look at the Seven Deadly Sins and Their Remedies, which numerous cohorts have found helpful, and they again read the poetry of Gerard Manley Hopkins and Mary Oliver.

Posted by Joe Creech

 

From the Colloquium, Graduate Fellows Edition

Since 2006, the Lilly Fellows Program Director has published a “From the Colloquium” column about four times per year. The idea behind this column is to share some of the common readings from the colloquia of the Lilly Postdoctoral Fellows Program and the Lilly Graduate Fellows Program. These works can be of great value for mentoring programs or faculty development projects at different campuses (or to add to your own reading lists).

Common readings and group discussion have been central to the Lilly Fellows Program’s (LFP) fellowship programs from their start twenty-six years ago. First with the Lilly Postdoctoral Teaching Fellowship program at Valparaiso University starting in 1992 and then with the Lilly Graduate Fellows Program in 2008, Fellows have encountered readings intended to engage Christian thought and practice as they intersect the tasks of teaching and scholarship that make up the work we do in the academy. The readings address these issues on both the personal and institutional level, examining our individual practices as scholars as well as those of our academic institutions (with, of course, a special emphasis on those institutions of higher learning that connect to a church-related mission).

Once a year, we focus on the readings that the three active cohorts of Lilly Graduate Fellows discuss. These Fellows are in their first three years of Graduate school. Each semester, the Lilly Graduate Fellow cohorts select readings that cluster around a particular theme. Here are some of those readings.

The members of the Sixth Cohort of Lilly Graduate Fellows, who began graduate school and the program in fall 2013 and who just completed their three year program, read and discussed materials focused, in the fall, on the theme “’There Lives the Dearest Freshness Deep Down Things’: Recovering Christian Particularity in a Secular Academy.” The Sixth Cohort’s mentors are Jane Kelley Rodeheffer of Pepperdine University and Arlin Migliazzo of Whitworth University. To explore the topic, the Sixth Cohort read: Gilead, by Marilyn Robinson, Tocqueville’s Democracy in America, perennial favorite Susan VanZanten’s Joining the Mission, Mark Noll and James Turner, The Future of Christian Learning: An Evangelical and Catholic Dialogue (Thomas A. Howard, Editor), and selections from George Marsden’s Twilight of American Enlightenment. These main readings were accompanied by the following shorter works: Joel Carpenter, “The Christian Scholar in an Age of World Christianity”; Mary Douglas, “A Feeling for Hierarchy”; Paul Griffiths, “Seeking Egyptian Gold: A Fundamental Metaphor for the Christian Intellectual Life in a Religiously Diverse Age” (The Cresset 63:7, 2000: 30-35); Eric Gregory, “Beyond Public Reason: Love, Sin, and Augustinian Civic Virtue” from Politics and the Order of Love: An Augustinian Ethic of Democratic Citizenship; C.S. Lewis, “The Inner Ring,” and Cornell West, “Critical Theory and Christian Faith” from Prophetic Fragments. In the spring, the cohort shared readings contributed by the Fellows.

The members of the Seventh Cohort of Lilly Graduate Fellows, who completed the second year of their fellowship and who began their graduate studies in the fall of 2014, have been mentored by Paul Contino of Pepperdine University and Susan Felch of Calvin College. The themes for the fall and spring were “The Virtuous Learner” and “The Virtuous Teacher,” respectively.  The “spine” text for the fall was Dante’s Purgatorio and for the spring was Dante’s Paradiso. The group supplemented these texts with selections from Calvin’s Institutes; Bruce Cole’s Giotto: The Scrovegni Chapel, Padua; Rebecca DeYoung’s Glittering Vices; Josef Pieper’s The Four Cardinal Virtues and Faith, Hope, and Love; selections from Miroslav Volf and Dorothy C. Bass, Practicing Theology: Beliefs and Practices in Christian Life; Rowan Williams’ Ponder These Things: Praying with Icons of the Virgin; Rod Dreher’s, How Dante Can Save Your Life: The Life-Changing Wisdom of History’s Greatest Poem; Joseph Luzzi’s, In a Dark Wood: What Dante Taught Me About Grief, Healing, and the Mysteries of Love; James Elkins’ Pictures and Tears, Jean Leclercq, The Love of learning and the Desire for God; Basil the Great’s “Address to Young Men on the Right Use of Greek Literature”; Paul Griffiths’, “Seeking Egyptian Gold: A Fundamental Metaphor for the Christian Intellectual Life in a Religiously Diverse Age” (The Cresset 63:7, 2000: 30-35), and Jeanne Heffernan’s “The Art of Teaching and the Christian Vocation” in Michael R. Miller, ed., Doing More with Life: Connecting Christian Higher Education to a Call for Service.  The works by DeYoung, Williams, Elkins, and Leclercq have been perennial favorites of both the Lilly Graduate Fellows Program and the Lilly Postdoctoral Fellows Program.

Members of the Eighth Cohort of Lilly Graduate Fellows, who began graduate work in fall, 2015, addressed the topic, “The Proper use of Study” in fall, 2015, and the topic, “Sustaining Practices for the Christian Scholar,” in spring, 2016. The Mentors for the Eighth Cohort are Patrick Byrne of Boston College and Susan VanZanten of Seattle Pacific University.  To grapple with the topics, the cohort used as its “spine” text Augustine’s Confessions, and it also read selections from Miroslav Volf and Dorothy C. Bass, Practicing Theology: Beliefs and Practices in Christian Life, selections from Paulsell and L. Gregory Jones, The Scope of Our Art (one of the central books in all our colloquia), and from Dorothy C. Bass and Susan R. Briehl, On Our Way: Christian Practices for Living a Whole Life. The also read Simone Weil’s classic, “Reflections on the Right Use of School Studies” in Waiting for God, Paul Griffiths’ Intellectual Appetite: A Theological Grammar; John Williams’ Stoner; Phyllis Tickle’s (ed.) The Divine Hours; Dorothy C. Bass’ “Keeping Sabbath” in her Practicing Our Faith; Abraham Joshua Heschel’s classic, The Sabbath; Rowan Williams’ Ponder These Things: Praying with Icons of the Virgin; James K.A. Smith’s Desiring the Kingdom: Worship, Worldview, and Cultural Formation; Mark Schwehn’s, Exiles from Eden; selections from Aquinas’ Summa, and Brian E. Daley, “’To Be More Like Christ’: The Background and Implications of ‘Three Kinds of Humility,’” in Studies in the Spirituality of Jesuits, 27/1 (January 1995), 1–39.

Posted by Joe Creech

 

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