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New Issue of Christian Scholar’s Review

The newest issue of Christian Scholar’s Review arrived a few days ago.  Here is the table of contents:

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Christian Scholar’s Review
Volume XLII, Number 1 (Fall 2012)


NOTES FROM THE EDITOR

ARTICLES

  • Elizabeth Backfish “My God is a Rock in a Weary Land”: A Comparison of the Cries and Hopes
    of the Psalms and African American Slave Spirituals
    [Abstract]
  • Rick Kennedy Educating Bees: Humility as a Craft in Classical and Christian Liberal Arts [Abstract]
  • Gretchen Schwarz and Jill Martin Comenius: Dead White Guy for Twenty-first Century Education [Abstract]

REVIEW ESSAY

  • Brad A. Lau and Pamela Havey Lau Popular Music in Conversation with Christian Faith—A Review Essay [Abstract]

FOR THE CLASSROOM

  • Katherine E. Loughead and Kevin R. den Dulk For the Classroom: Honoring God in Red and Blue [Abstract]

REVIEWS

  • Alvin Plantinga, Where the Conflict Really Lies: Science, Religion, and Naturalism
Reviewed by Brian Glenney, Philosophy, Gordon College
  • Jay Riley Case, An Unpredictable Gospel: American Evangelicals and World Christianity, 1812— 1920
Douglas Jacobsen, Church History and Theology, Messiah College
  • Gerardo Marti, Worship Across the Racial Divide: Religious Music and the Multiracial Congregation
Reviewed by Todd E. Johnson, Worship, Theology and the Arts, Fuller Theological
Seminary
  • Richard J. Mouw, Abraham Kuyper: A Short and Personal Introduction
Reviewed by David McNutt, Biblical and Theological Studies, Wheaton College
  • Ken Albala and Trudy Eden (eds), Food and Faith in Christian Culture
Reviewed by David Grumett, Divinity, University of Edinburgh
  • John Sullivan (ed.), Communicating Faith
Reviewed by Christine J. Gardner, Communication, Wheaton College
  • Michael Pasquale and Nathan L. K. Bierma, Every Tribe and Tongue: A Biblical Vision for
    Language and Society
Reviewed by Michael Lessard-Clouston, Applied Linguistics and TESOL, Biola
University
  • Peter Enns, The Evolution of Adam: What the Bible Does and Doesn’t Say about Human Origins
Reviewed by Matthew Emile Vaughan, (Ph.D. Student) Religion and Education,
Union Theological Seminary in the City of New York
 

 Posted by Joe Creech

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